2010 Party-List | Politics News

Party-List Groups from official ballot on May 2010 election

What are Party lists?  Why should we vote for them?

Here are excerpts from Wikipedia regarding Political parties:

The Philippines has a multi-party system with numerous political parties, in which no one party often has a chance of gaining power alone, and parties must work with each other to form coalition governments. There are two types of parties in the Philippines: major parties, who correspond typically to traditional political parties, and minor parties or party-list organizations, who rely on the party-list system to win Congressional seats.

The party-list system is the name designated for the sectoral representation. Under the 1987 Constitution, the electorate can vote for certain party-list organizations in order to give voice to significant minorities of society that would otherwise not be adequately represented through geographical district. From 1987-1998, sectoral representatives were appointed by the President.

Since 1998, each voter votes for a single party-list organization. Organizations that garner at least 2% of the total number of votes are awarded one representative for every 2% up to a maximum of three representatives. Thus, there can be at most 50 sectoral representatives in Congress, though usually no more than 20 are elected because many organizations do not reach the required 2% minimum number of votes.

After the 2007 election, in a controversial decision, COMELEC changed how it allocates the party-list seats. Under the new formula only one party will have the maximum 3 seats. It based its decision on a formula contained in a Supreme Court decision.

To determine the number of seats for sectoral representatives, the formula for the quotient is:

number of seats for sectoral representatives

where:

  • S is the number of seats allocated for sectoral representation,
  • D is the total number of district representatives, and
  • D / 0.8 is the total number of members of the House.

To see more detailed formulae, click here:  Sectoral representation

Here is also an excerpt from Solidarity Philippines Australia Network:

A party-list system can help create a healthy democracy, providing a citizens’ voice in Congress and in local government. The Philippine party-list system aims to increase the representation, particularly of “marginalized and underrepresented” sectors and enhance transparency and accountability, leading to more efficient government. Political parties are strengthened, encouraging program and platform-based politics instead of weak affiliations between opportunists. This challenges moneyed and patronage politics that have bred corruption and inefficiency, hindering the country’s development.

Now that you know what party-list is, can you help us choose which among these party-list representatives is best to vote?

 

Major political parties
Name Abbr. Leader
Lakas-Kabalikat ng Malayang Pilipino-Christian Muslim Democrats Lakas Kampi CMD Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo
Nationalist People’s Coalition NPC Eduardo Cojuangco, Jr.
Liberal Party LP Manuel "Mar" Roxas II
Nacionalista Party NP Manuel Villar, Jr.
Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan PDP-Laban Aquilino Pimentel, Jr.
Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino PMP Joseph Estrada
Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino LDP Edgardo Angara
People’s Reform Party PRP Miriam Defensor-Santiago
Bagumbayan-VNP Bagumbayan-VNP Richard Gordon

 

 

Here is the Comelec official ballot list for party-list groups:

 

(Minor) Party-List Groups
1. ANG PAMILYA FORMERLY ANC 48. AGBIAG 95. ANG TRABAHANTE 142. DIWA
2. 1-AANI 49. AGHAM 96. ANG TSINOY 143. EMMANUEL
3. 1-AABA 50. AGILA 97. ANUPA 144. FFW
4. 1-AHAPO 51. AGRI 98. APEC 145. FIL-MUS
5. 1-AK 52. AHON 99. APELA 146. FIRM 24-K
6. 1-CARE 53. AK 100. APO 147. GABRIELA
7. 1-NET 54. AKAP 101. APOI 148. GREEN FORCE
8. 1-TUBIG (FORMERLY AAWAS) 55. AKAP BATA 102. ARAL 149. IVAP
9. 1-UTAK 56. AKAP TAO 103. ARARO 150. KAAGAPAY
10. 1GANAP/GUARDIANS 57. AKB 104. ARC 151. KAAKBAY
11. 1ST KABAGIS 58. AKBAYAN 105. ARCAPP 152. KABATAAN
12. 1ST PRISA 59. AKI 106. AS 153. KABAYAN
13. A BLESSED PARTY LIST 60. AKMA-PTM 107. ASAHAN MO 154. KAKUSA
14. A TAMBAY 61. AKO 108. AT 155. KALAHI
15. A TEACHER 62. AKO AGILA 109. ATING KOOP 156. KALINGA
16. A-IPRA 63. AKO BAHAY 110. ATM 157. KASAPI
17. AA-KASOSYO PARTY 64. AKSI 111. ATONG PAGLAUM 158. KATRIBU
18. AAMA 65. ALAGAD 112. ATS 159. KATUTUBO
19. AAMBIS-OWA 66. ALAY BUHAY 113. AVE 160. KLBP
20. AANI 67. ALE 114. AVPAP 161. LPGMA
21. AAPS 68. ALIF 115. AWAT 162. LYPAD
22. AASCA 69. ALIM 116. BABAE KA 163. NCCP
23. ABA 70. ALLUMAD 117. BAGO 164. OPO
24. ABA ILONGGO 71. ALMA 118. BANAT 165. ORAGON
25. ABAKADA 72. ALMANA 119. BANDILA 166. PACYAW
26. ABAMIN 73. ALNA 120. BANGON TRANSPORT 167. PBA
27. ABANG LINGKOD 74. ALON 121. BANTAY 168. PCL
28. ABANTE KA 75. ALUM 122. BAYAN MUNA 169. PEP
29. ABAY PARAK 76. ALYANSA NG OFW 123. BAYANI 170. PFP
30. ABBA-AMA 77. AMA 124. BH 171. PM (MANGGAGAWA)
31. ABC 78. AMANA 125. BIDA (BATANG IWAS) 172. PM (MASDA)
32. ABO 79. AMANG 126. BIDA (BINGKIS) 173. SABOD
33. ABONO 80. AME 127. BIGKIS 174. SAGIP
34. ABOT TANAW 81. AMIN 128. BINHI 175. SB
35. ABP-BICOLNON 82. AMS 129. BIYAHENG PINOY 176. SENIOR CITIZENS
36. ABROAD 83. AN WARAY 130. BUHAY 177. SMART
37. ABS 84. ANAD 131. BUKID 178. TUCP
38. ACMA 85. ANAK 132. BUKLOD FILIPINA 179. UCAP
39. ACT TEACHERS 86. ANAKALUSUGAN 133. BUTIL 180. UFS
40. ACTS 87. ANAKPAWIS 134. CHINOY 181. UNI-MAD
41. ADA 88. ANG KASANGGA 135. CIBAC 182. UNLAD PILIPINAS
42. ADAM 89. ANG LADLAD 136. COCOFED 183. VENDORS PARTY LIST
43. ADD 90. ANG MINERO 137. COFA 184. VFP
44. ADD-TRIBAL 91. ANG NICP 138. CONSLA 185. WOMENPOWER
45. AFPSEGCO 92. ANG PADER 139. COOP-NATCCO 186. YACAP
46. AG 93. ANG PDR 140. CPM 187. YES WE CAN
47. AGAP 94. ANG SAMAKA 141. DAMAYAN  

 

Each party-list has different concerns.  I think I better add in my next post what they do and their websites.

 

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